Unfortunately it is becoming harder to make movies, and most of the time, it takes years between having finished one film and starting to shoot the next. "Congo's first feature film for 25 years opens in 18 countries: The award-winning thriller Viva Riva! Get The Latest IndieWire Alerts And Newsletters Delivered Directly To Your Inbox. He studied art school. Interview: 'Viva Riva' Filmmaker Djo Tunda Wa Munga Hopes To Usher In A New Wave Of Congolese Cinema Like many middle and upper class children from what, growing up, he knew as Zaire, Munga spent much of his childhood away from home, studying at a boarding school in Belgium. The workshop teacher Dominique Lohle, who was a filmmaker and a radical independent thinker, thought I ought to go to film school. Congo needs fewer metanarratives from the West and more of Radio Tele Manika. Al Pacino is great. The workshop teacher. Like in real life. What follows is a relentlessly action packed story, with twists, turns, and corruption on even the most surprising of levels; it seems that every character in ‘Riva’ has one goal in mind: to manipulate anyone and everyone for more money. ", For this reason, his film company is based in Kinshasa. This slick Congolese thriller from emerging director Djo Munga (State of Mind) takes us through the crime-ridden backstreets of DR Congo’s capital with electrifying pacing and a deliciously noir-soaked nihilism. The Congolese cites the crime film, 'Carlito's Way,' as a project he wished he had made: "It is a brilliant piece of art - a great thriller and a fantastic essay about the human condition, cruising beyond time and space. Did he feel any pressure shooting one of the first features in the Lingala language, to make something a little more serious? Born in Kinshasa, Djo Tunda wa Munga left the Democratic Republic of Congo for Belgium at the age of nine. It went down well in Kinshasa, too. That would be twenty: One every single year of my career. His debut feature, Viva Riva! Of course, there is a tension between diaspora Africans and the Congolese who never left. In 2006, Djo established Suka! “Viva Riva” follows charismatic Riva (Patsha Bay Mukuna), who, upon returning to his hometown is greeted warmly by family and friends, but soon must go into hiding when the gangsters he stole a truck load worth of oil from — a precious, and thusly high priced commodity in the region – catch up to him. found: IMDb website, viewed Oct. 30, 2013 (Djo Munga; Djo Tunda wa Munga; film producer, director, and writer; born Oct. 25, 1972 in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo; after completing studies at the National Film School of Belgium, he returned to Kinshasa. For his 2010 thriller movie Viva Riva! "To be able to say: 'My society is very macho, my society has a problem with prostitution, the family has collapsed.' ‘Virunga’ is an important film, even if it lacks perspectives from local stakeholders. – was the first Congolese feature film production in twenty-three years. "I'm not saying everybody should return, that's up to you. Ask yourself any question you think I should have asked and answer it. It's a typical line: more pulpy than preachy, Munga's film is a pacy 90-minute adrenaline rush through the streets of the Democratic Republic of Congo's capital. I like multilayered films that manage to capture various elements and aspects of existence. Interview: 'Viva Riva' Filmmaker Djo Tunda Wa Munga Hopes To Usher In A New Wave Of Congolese Cinema T here is a scene in Djo Tunda Wa Munga's Congolese thriller Viva Riva! "My biggest concern was how to represent women. Viva Riva! |  Wed 22 Jun 2011 22.01 BST , for various reasons. Media in category "Djo Tunda Wa Munga" The following 2 files are in this category, out of 2 total. All these aspects combined, make me wish I had made the film. This Article is related to: Uncategorized and tagged Foreign Directors, Foreign Films, Interview. "There was the war, the economy had collapsed, it was misery. You don't want to miss the point, or, even if you make the point, you don't want to have others miss it. After completing his studies at the National Film School of Belgium, INSAS, he returned to Kinshasa where he worked as producer and assistant director for various international TV productions. ‘Soul’ Aims for Oscar Glory as Disney Shifts to Streaming, but Not All Films Deserve the Same Release, How Closed Theaters, Drive-In Movies, and Netflix Supremacy Are Shaping Oscar Season, ‘Chicago 7’ Vs. the World: How Aaron Sorkin’s Awards-Friendly Epic Jolted a Strange Awards Season, Introducing ‘Deep Dive’: Damon Lindelof and His Team Go Behind the Scenes of ‘Watchmen’, ‘Succession’: How Editing Helps Every Dinner Scene Come to Life — Deep Dive, Becoming Hooded Justice: The ‘Watchmen’ Craft Team Analyzes the Emotional, Pivotal Scene – Deep Dive, 40 Must-See New Movies to See This Fall Season, The Best Movies Eligible for the 2021 Oscars Right Now, Jessie Buckley Won’t Explain ‘Ending Things,’ but She Will Reveal What Terrified Her Most. I remember the place but not a specific movie. At the age of 10 he left for Belgium. Publicity Listings where one gangster says to another: "Kinshasa the beautiful, Kinshasa the … That would be twenty: One every single year of my career. After completing his studies at the National Film School of Belgium, INSAS, he returned to Kinshasa where he worked as producer and assistant director for various international TV productions. Even though Carlito is aware of the mistakes he has made in life, he is still unable to change. My brother suggested that I attend this 8mm-workshop during a period of crisis in my life. also won at the 2011 MTV Movie Awards for Best African Movie [5] I believe directors should continue to film, again and again until we get to these moments where we perform to the best of our potential. Viva Riva! After completing his studies at the National Film School of Belgium, INSAS, he returned to Kinshasa where he worked as producer and assistant director for various international TV productions. Usually we don’t see reflective and analytical gangsters on film. I was worrying a lot about my work, creativity and the future. Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Djo Tunda wa Munga was born in 1972 in Kinshasa, DR Congo where he spent his childhood. It won 6 African movie awards, an MTV award for best African film and has sold widely internationally (US, UK, Australia, France, Germany...)In 2012, Djo founded his UK-based company to develop international projects and create content for a global market. also won at the 2011 MTV Movie Awards for Best African Movie[5], The film was released in 18 African countries and portrayed a gritty view of life in Kinshasa.